Nature Photography: Coexistence (No. 58) – “There is a Crack … in Everything” Photomontage

10 February 2020

Lens:

“There is a Crack in Everything” Photomontage; All Rights Reserved 2020 Sally W. Donatello

Click onto image to enlarge. Let me know your response to this photomontage. Prints are available upon request.

Pens:

The lyrics from Leonard Cohen’s “Anthem ” inspired my photomontage in the Lens section. At the heart of his words, which were released in the 1992 album of the same title, is a warning about the imperfections of the human condition. His entire poetic song is nine stanzas; each speaks to the power of hope — the crack that lets the light radiate inward and outward. The song took him a decade to complete, and it is as relevant in 2020 as it was over twenty-five years ago.

Here are the first and last stanzas, which through repetition echoes the significance of the other seven stanzas that comment on humanity’s ability to create chaos and wonder. Cohen’s work was greatly influenced by his reverence and study of Zen Buddhism, whose philosophy and tenets were a mix of how light sustains life and recognizes that human animal never will reach perfection.

“Anthem” first and last stanzas:

“Ring the bells that still can ring                                                                                                     Forget your perfect offering                                                                                                             There is a crack, a crack in everything                                                                                             That’s how the light gets in                                                                                                              That’s how the light gets in                                                                                                                                            That’s how the light gets in.”

The image on the left in the Lens section is a trio of floating feathers. They represent the environmental crisis and the imbalance it is creating: the loss, for example, of one million birds at the mercy of death by plastic that is found in the oceans (Sierra Club magazine, January 2020). The image of egg shells on the right represents life and its fragility due to human intervention; the egg births life and also provides sustenance for many creatures. In the center is the dawning of bright light that gives power to what can be possible: cracks in the proverbial world that produces civilizations that thrive and inspire the  longevity of human ingenuity.

This winter has made it clear that climate change and chemicals are severely affecting the bird population. I am witnessing that decline in my backyard. Usually, I use three large bags of birdseed by mid-winter; to date I’ve used half of one bag. And family and friends have experienced and noticed this change.

To recognize the “crack in everything” is to recognize the history of human existence, and the light sustaining our continuance.

 

 

 

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Nature Photography: Coexistence (No. 57) – Spring Births Clarity and Confusion

03 February 2020

Spring Births Clarity and Confusion; All Rights Reserved 2020 Sally W. Donatello

Click onto image to enlarge. Let me know your response to this photomontage. Prints are available upon request.

Pens:

Spring is accelerating its arrival. Temps are forecast to waiver between 40s and 60s throughout the week, clearly unseasonable. Daffodils are growing skyward. Birds are scouting birdhouses. It’s extraordinary. January is usual our coldest month, but this year it was mild and at times toasty warm.

This winter bird sightings have diminished, piercing my heart and mood. Today at least the sunlight will reign. And I plan to submerge myself in a walk at a local park. Then I will continue to work in my upper gardens, where I will trim grasses and widen more gardens.

Every year I reduce grassy areas, and celebrate another plot to plant native species or wildflowers. I’ll do anything to give back to wildlife its habitats, and encourage the wild’s staying power.

Most days I hear the hawks overhead and their songs expand my emotions, giving them a moment of both calm and exhilaration. When I submerge myself in nature, I reduce the inner chatter and concentrate on tasks. My mind is bathed in a mini-sabbatical.

In the Lens section is a photomontage that represents the clarity and confusion that Mother Nature and human nature undoubtedly are experiencing. This winter is a prime example.

While some areas of the world have extreme reactions (drought, fires, hurricanes, extinction of species) to the piercing of the nature world, here in the Mid-Atlantic of the USA spring seems to have arrived. It feels great, but also terrifies. In my lifetime (many, many, many decades) the four seasons have existed in a rhythmic pattern. With the climate crisis that syncopation probably has evaporated forever. And so it is both clarifying and confusing. We know the score; we must act on the confusion and pain that the clarity has given us.

The image’s foreground is meant to show winter’s leafless trees, and the background exemplifies life that soon will burst forth. Spring will return a force of energy to the landscape. While its essence is being altered, reactions must follow. The question remains: How much confusion and pain does it take to energize humanity, to understand that our very existence is being changed in plain sight?

Still, encouragement comes from Britain’s step to fight the climate crisis. Here is the link to view the announcement:

“Reshape economy to fight climate crisis, says Prince Charles;”
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/jan/22/reshape-economy-to-fight-climate-crisis-charles-tells-davos

Here is a quote:

“Climate change, biodiversity loss and global warming are the greatest threats humanity has ever faced, he warned, adding that capital needs to be properly deployed in order to tackle these threats.”

 

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Nature Photography: Coexistence (No. 56) – Coexistence and Survival

27 January 2020

Coexistence and Survival; All Rights Reserved 2020 Sally W. Donatello

Click onto image to enlarge. Let me know your response to this photomontage. Prints are available upon request.

Pens:

27 January 2020

Our fragile planet succumbs to its assaults by human intervention. As a result there is a daily surge that pierces our psyches and thoughts. And so we march forward seeking ways to be. The constant invasion of “news” that dishes out truth and variations on lies creates an atmosphere to “just say no.” This constant pollution of noise places us in a state of uncertainty. At least we can curtail listening to and reading the verbiage. My formula to cope is to spread hope and optimism, which seems almost beyond the sight lines.

In the Lens section is a photomontage that links the results of the climate crisis to renewal. The background represents the increase of many examples of invasive acts upon nature and thus human nature. For instance, the ongoing devastation of fires tilts our sense of reality. But Mother Nature will begin to heal with the buds of new life.

It’s incomprehensible that the tipping point has not been realized by those that can change the trajectory of the damage to the wild, to humanity, to life as we know it. BUT I believe strongly in (literally an metaphorically) on-the-ground action.

Did you know that if 350,000 people were vegans (giving up dairy and meat) for a month, the result would be the reduction of carbon emissions by 45,000 tons (The New York Times, Pledging to Go Vegan, at Least for January, by Alyson Krueger, 18 January 2020). This movement to join Veganuary, the “campaign was started in the United Kingdom in 2014 … According to Veganuary, 750,000 people from 192 countries have joined the pledge, with about half signing up for 2020.”

I’ve been a vegetarian for over forty years, but I do love cheese. And I adore my recent switch to oat milk, having given up soy or almond milk for specific reasons (medical and environmental in that order). I definitely will pick a summer month (when my garden is at its most productive) to “go” vegan. At least to see how it affects my everyday meal choices.

This reassessment of selection of ingredients reminds me of my early days as a vegetarian: how availability was minimal and what was available was not always palatable. Vegetarian cooking has been a magical journey of, well, magic in choices, flare, taste and more inclusive public acceptance. It’s a lifestyle that I inhabit with complete enthusiasm each and every day.

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Nature Photography: Coexistence (No. 55) – Nature’s Resilience Inspires Photomontage 2

21 January 2020

Lens:

Mother Nature’s Resilience Inspires Photomontage 2; All Rights Reserved 2020; Sally W. Donatello

Click onto image to enlarge. Let me know your response to this photomontage. Prints are available upon request.

Pens:

On a day forecast for our first measurable snow thoughts of spring and my gardens hover with wonder. Gardening, especially native plants, is a critical act to honor the planet and my love of nature. As a steward of the land for decades, I have sought to exchange swaths of grass for gardens filled with flowers, plants, trees and vegetables.

To return the land to the wild is to fight the climate crisis, and I’ve been at it since the 1970s. The rewards are monumental for one’s emotional and physical well-being, even for those that observe the transformation.

And the winter continues with temps that kept yesterday’s original forecast from snow to inches of rain. Temperature and weather have become part of daily concern and consideration. They have entered our bodies and minds with an invasive force, being a constant topic of conversation.

In the Lens section is another salute to planet Earth. The earth has the ability to revitalize the soil and thus the air we breathe. Carbon monoxide is not our number one enemy: humanity is. But the balance between the carbon monoxide released into the ether by green things and oxygen taken in by human beings is the equilibrium of interdependence needed for us to survive.

The image blends these ideas. Small globes represent the release of carbon monoxide from the soil into the air where we take the oxygen to sustain our bodies. The growth of plant life within the globes is the result of the symbiosis between nature and humanity. It gives me pause, and I wonder why others do not accept this truth of interdependence, what we need to sustain life on Earth.

Consider watching this TED Talk titled “A climate change solution that’s right under our feet” in which “biogeochemist Asmeret Asefaw Berhe dives into the science of soil and shares how we could use its awesome carbon-trapping power to offset climate change.”

 

 

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Nature Photography: Coexistence (no. 54) – Nature’s Resilience Inspires

13 January 2020

Lens:

Nature’s Resilience Photomontage; All Rights Reserved 2020 Sally W. Donatello

Click onto image to enlarge. Let me know your response to this photomontage. Prints are available upon request.

Pens:

There is no need to reiterate the devastation being waged on Australia, on nature and humanity. Suffice it say, this horrific event is causing damage that may never replace the loss. The animal population alone is cause for great distress. It’s a horrible way to bring attention to the present and future that we have created. But crisis intervention is a known fact that forces action. Still, the Australian government has chosen not to act.

And so the rest of us must help. Here is an article from The New York Times that lists organizations that are supporting this human-made and natural destruction:  “How to Help Victims of Australia’s Fires: The deadly wildfires, fanned by wind and fueled by scorching heat, are raging across the southeast of the country,” by Christine Hauser and Laura M. Holson (06 January 2020).

If you want a quick and easy way to contribute, here’s the information: WIRES, or the NSW Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service Inc., is Australia’s largest wildlife rescue organization. Donations can be made online, by telephone and through Facebook and PayPal.

The escalation of climate-related disasters continues. Nature and human nature suffer in tandem, and thus our interdependence is center stage. Still, for the very short-term Mother Nature and human nature exhibit their resilience and power to forge ahead.

Fires are part of the history that heals and rejuvenates, demonstrating a pattern in natural history and science. Fire hurts everything in its pathway. Even great devastation results in rebirth in forests and on  land. But the rage in the Australian fires is beyond what we have seen in my country, and the hurt grows.

These stories of worldwide climate emergency motivate me to create some lingering optimism. In the Lens section is my interpretation of how the earth renews itself with circles of hope rolling across the earth as it heals and rejuvenates. Resilience is power.

 

 

 

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Nature Photography: Coexistence (No. 53): Climate Alarm Photomontage

06 January 2020

Lens:

Climate Alarm Photomontage; All Rights Reserved 2020 Sally W. Donatello

Click onto image to enlarge. Let me know your response to this photomontage. Prints are available upon request.

Pens:

06 January 2020

This morning continued the dawning of the year—a year that may prove to surprise even the most cynical. As the weeks fill their destiny, I will be suggesting ways to soothe our journey.

Here is an example. Last week as I made my way north about forty minutes from my home, I searched TED Talks for a presentation, preferably about climate activism and climate justice. And behold, there I found the TEDx Countdown. Since that first introduction I’ve listened to it three times and joined their efforts.

Excerpted from prnewswire.com/news: ” TED and Future Stewards with Christiana Figures announced Countdown: a global collaboration to turn the tide on climate change. The name Countdown refers to the necessary reduction to zero net greenhouse gas emissions called for by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), in order to mitigate the worst effects of climate change. A summit of 1,000 leaders and influencers – representing a cross-section of nations, businesses, cities, and citizens – will be held in Bergen, Norway from October 6-9, 2020. The following day – 10.10.2020 – will be celebrated as a major global gathering made up of thousands of connected local events in cities, neighborhoods, schools and workplaces around the globe—coordinated by the global TEDx community and other partners. Countdown content will be promoted by YouTube, and many YouTube creators will be invited to take part both in Bergen and at local events being held around the globe.”

Please view countdown.ted.com to read details about this collaboration and join the effort.

In the Lens section is a photomontage that reflects my feelings about this economic, environmental, social and political  crisis. It represents the intense and increasing threats imposed upon the planet by human inactions.

Candles come alive with fire, and fire can be a tool for survival or a tool for destruction. We are seeing the latter carve its way across global pathways.

Make a wish on these candles (sculpted by the wintry landscape) to stir the human spirit to put pressure on every nation, every government, every leader, each individual to get involved. And to realize that we can reverse the tides, we can avoid a dystopian future.

 

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Nature Photography: Coexistence (No. 52): Shades of Climate Crisis and Hope is not Enough

30 December 2019

Lens:

Shades of Climate Crisis Photomontage; All Rights Reserved 2019 Sally W. Donatello

Click onto image to enlarge. Let me know your response to this photomontage. Prints are available upon request.

Pens:

May Stevens (1959-2019) once said of her life as a painter and an activist: “The idea was to make your own life by taking action and going beyond ordinary existence. Just earning a living, not living a mental life, and not trying to change things was a life that was frightening to me. You become human only when you make this great struggle for realizing your life and making it count.”

 

My Ode to 2020:

Winter officially arrived a little over a week ago, yet the last few weeks have been unseasonable cold and grey. And as the days continue to lighten glacially, my mood fits that trajectory. Still, I cling to the optimist in me, knowing that each day leads to greater illumination.

Over the last few months I have been assessing and processing the intersection between my ideology, philosophy and photography. This process has led me to review my blog and its evolution of content over almost nine years (which astounds me). The journey has led to my own tipping point about this work—work that started with some direction, but escalated into a precise direction: to honor the interaction between nature and human nature.

As the New Year appears with its own cadence, an artist friend and I will meet frequently to experiment and encourage each other’s sense of seeing the world and affects upon our creative works. Inner and outer forces have brought me to this fork in the road.

In the Lens section is a biomorphic photomontage that solicits thoughts about the climate crisis and the worldwide alert that couldn’t be more alarming. My image shows a fragmented silhouette of multiple trees against the dark and some light in the background—a background that forecasts crisis.

We have a decade (give or take) to change this harrowing reality. Each of us can discover ways to steady our own emotional reaction by actions, doing something in our tiny teeny slice of the universe. In whatever way that “doing” translates, it can help us through the days and nights.

I have been aware for decades about living more sustainably and earth friendly, and I continue to do more. But the urgency mounts. My photography and writing are avenues to maneuver the minefields of this human-made crisis.

I keep anxiously waiting and asking: When will the course of the river’s flow change? When will the greater good of humanity and the planet outweigh the greed and power lust of my governmental officials and others around our spinning globe?

Time is ticking faster than I can breathe it inward. Its sound is louder than the silence. But we can do it; we can turn the corner toward healing the planet and ourselves.

Personal awareness through individual activism, community activism and worldwide activism are my dearest wishes for the world’s healthy rejuvenation and renewal. Hope is not enough; our actions and voices are the light in the Earth’s future.

Posted in Black-and-White Photography, Climate Crisis, Digital Art, Human Nature, Mobile Photography, Nature, Nature Photography, Photography, Photomontage, Writing | Tagged , , , , , , | 26 Comments