Longwood Gardens Photo Shoot

14 October 2011

Lens:

Flower Garden Walk

Chrysanthemums, 2011 Flower, 2011; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2011

Chrysanthemums, 2011; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2011

Flower, 2011

Double-Purple Moonflower Datura, 2011; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2011   
Flower Head, 2011

Close-up of Double-Purple Moonflower Datura, 2011; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2011

Grasses 2011

Grasses, 2011; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2011

Walk to the Italian Water Garden

Tree, 2011

Autumnal Tree, 2011; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2011

Autumn Leaves, 2011

Autumnal Leaves, 2011; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2011

Tree Support, 2011

Tree Support, 2011; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2011

Water Shadows, 2011

Shadows, 2011; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2011

Inside and Outside Conservatory

Parasols, 2011

Parasols, 2011; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2011

Ferns and Parasols, 2011

Ferns and Parasols, 2011; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2011

Waterlily, 2011

Waterlily, 2011; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2011

Pens:

I really do not enjoy the game of comparison when it comes to East Coast vs. West Coast—too many disparate differences. It’s as though I must face the yin/yang of it. I’ve lived in both places, but the East Coast has been my home for 99% of my days. My ample “university” city (about 30,000) sits dutifully on an advantageous longitude and latitude. We can arrive in New York City within two and a half hours and D.C. in less than two. Philadelphia is a quickie train ride and forty-five minutes by car. Amish country is an easy jaunt. We have nearly a plenitude of rural and urban destinations practically at our doorsteps. When I thought about this week’s camera shoot, it took two seconds to make plans to head to Longwood Gardens (Kennett Square, PA), which is on a scenic route passing Winterthur Museum and Gardens (northern Delaware)–another marvel in my area’s cultural tool box.

Autumn has been low-key this year–no huge color bursts. But we’ve been happily bragging about the gorgeous temps. Monday’s forecast was in lower 80s. Couldn’t ask for a better morning to capture the morning light and stroll through one of the nation’s premier gardens with its flora to stagger the senses.

As I parked my car, I noticed a reasonable showing of cars at the opening hour: 9:00 a.m. Upon leaving, the parking lot was jammed to overflow with license plates from up and down the East Coast and even Illinois.

There was no shortage of ages and enthusiasm as people filled their aesthetic and horticultural limits for the day. Nearly everyone was armed with a camera or cellphone. The flowers and landscape glowed with their appreciation.

I took over 175 shots, and under the Pens section of this post are eleven that were my favorites. The rest are trashed and belong there. Even in this autumn’s slow pace toward coloration of tree foliage, I did see a few brilliantly hued trees on my walk to the Italian Water Garden.

Longwood Gardens is a gift for my sensibilities. There is always something new and enticing to savor. It’s a place to meditate with the visual language of Mother Nature and a place where human nature is protecting her legacy. See the Gardens’ Website at http://www.longwoodgardens.org and hopefully you’ll have the opportunity to visit, especially between June 09 and September 01, 2012. British artist and light designer Bruce Munro will interweave light installations in some of the indoor and outdoor gardens–absolutely not-to-be-missed.

Every region has its popular cultural icons–its heritage that intrigues. It’s a matter of one’s interests and predilections. Lucky for me that my hometown allows for dual experiences (city and country) that pulse with the new even as they are steeped in the old. But it also allows me to add layer-upon-layer of stellar destinations within the time it takes to make dinner or read a juicy book. What choices we human have.  

Note: Please let me know which of the eleven is your favorite.

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4 Responses to Longwood Gardens Photo Shoot

  1. I love the moon flower shot (facing it) and also the grasses below it. The ferns and parasols are very interesting too. The texture is wonderful in that photo, and my eye just wants to keep going back to it. Love your write up too. Both East and West definitely have their advantages. Great post!

    • Thanks, I believe one of the advantages of the blogging life is to meet other photographers (and writers) and share visions. We each see our external universe through our own brains and (literal) lenses. I am enjoying the lessons and visions of other photographers.

  2. nancy Gray says:

    Double-Purple Moonflower Datura is the best. What an angle you used for the shot. The colors are amazing.

    Nancy

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