Foreshadowing Spring, Part Two

08 March 2012

Lens:

White Hellebore, March 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

Back View of White Hellebore, March 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

Center of Lenten Rose Hellebore, March 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

Back View of Lenten Rose Hellebore, March 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

Close Up of Lenten Rose Hellebore, March 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

Let me know which view of the Hellebore is your favorite.

Pens:

The same day that I took photographs at my alma mater’s Botanic Gardens, I walked to the woodland area of my backyard where the Hellebore proudly nestle near my pond. At the Botanic Gardens I found a White Hellebore that complements the Lenten Rose variety that grows next to my woodland area. Before I visited the gardens, I pledged to immortalize my own Hellebore.

These perennial forecasters of spring are one of my favorite early bloomers. Every year I react with such glee that I stand in hesitation at their presence–the sheer surprise of their flowering. Their clusters hang with heads downward where their fully-spreading beauty cannot be seen. They seem to be watching as the earth transcends. With little effort I can raise a blossom to spy on their delicacy and elegance. Reward is long-lasting.

One of the pleasures of its early seasonal flowering is its staying power, and the round of leaves that remain as reminders of their role in the revitalization of the landscape. Maybe its popularity has increased, because it’s an evergreen and never really disappears from view.

Even though the Lenten Rose is a non-native, it’s adaptable and low maintenance. And, if kept in the understory, the plant will continue to spread and act as a gorgeous naturalizer. I think of mine as rings growing inside the trunk of a tree: as the tree ages, its girth widens. In my garden the Hellebore gathers its momentum in a circular pattern of multiplying groupings. They’re a few feet in circumference, and it pleases me as I watch their happiness.

Throughout the world Hellebores are used in homeopathy and traditional medicines, which adds another bit of interest to this stunning plant. The colors range from (almost) snow-white to deep reddish-purple, and give gardeners a range of choices to cultivate. If you’re searching for an early foreshadower of the shift from the monochromatic glow of winter to the sparkling colors of spring, you just might fall in love with the irresistible Hellebore.

Note: As always I welcome comments about this post or any others on my blog. If you want to view Part One of “Foreshadowing Spring,” please click here.

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12 Responses to Foreshadowing Spring, Part Two

  1. cindy knoke says:

    Absolutely stunning. Kudos~

  2. igardendaily says:

    Hello! Lovely photos all of them but my favorites are 3 and 5. I love the colors in 3 but the “look” of 5. May I ask if you have used a macro lens for all of these? I’m just starting to learn how to use a macro lens and it seems quite a bit more complex than my regular 35 mm! (ha, ha)

    • Yes, the macro is my favorite lens. It allows us to see what we usually are unable to view. It brings such surprises. As always it’s experience and experimentation that bring better results. The more that you use the lens, the more that you will understand its capabilities and possibilities. Thanks for your kind comments, Sally

  3. I like the photo of Centre of Lenten Rose best of all but love them all.

  4. Can’t wait for Spring here!!! Great images and colors…

    • Spring “seems” to have arrived here–the East Coast of the USA. Hopefully, we will not get a March hard frost to effect the fruit trees’ production. Thanks for visiting, Sally

  5. Hard choice! I like the first two – maybe the first a bit more. Exquisite.

  6. The first photo is definitely my favorite! They are all beautiful tho! Great post!

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