WordPress’ Weekly Photo Challenge: Growth, Part Two

13 August 2012

Lens:

“False Hope,”” steel outdoor sculpture, by Christopher Keiper

I. “False Hope”

1. “False Hope,” Christopher Keiper, Outdoor Sculpture, UD, Nikon DSLR, August 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

II. Impending Storm

2. “False Hope,” Christopher Keiper, Outdoor Sculpture, UD, Nikon DSLR, August 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

3. “False Hope,” Christopher Keiper, Outdoor Sculpture, UD, Nikon DSLR, August 2012 © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

4. “False Hope,” Christopher Keiper, Outdoor Sculpture, UD, Nikon DSLR, August 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

5. “False Hope,” Christopher Keiper, Outdoor Sculpture, UD, Nikon DSLR, August 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

III. Details

6. “False Hope,” Christopher Keiper, Outdoor Sculpture, UD, iPhone 4s, August 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

7. “False Hope,” Christopher Keiper, Outdoor Sculpture, UD, iPhone 4s, August 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

8. “False Hope,” Christopher Keiper, Outdoor Sculpture, UD, DSLR Nikon. August 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

9. “False Hope,” Christopher Keiper, Outdoor Sculpture, UD, Nikon DSLR. August 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

10. “False Hope,” Christopher Keiper, Outdoor Sculpture, UD, Nikon DSLR, August 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

11. “False Hope,” Christopher Keiper, Outdoor Sculpture, UD, Nikon DSLR, August 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

12. “False Hope,” Christopher Keiper, Outdoor Sculpture, UD, Nikon DSLR, August 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

Let me know which is your favorite.

Pens:

On August 03 WordPress’ Weekly Photo Challenge was “Growth.” My submission, which can be seen here, prompted a few readers to ask for more images of the outdoor sculpture. I returned this weekend and have posted some additional views, including a few from the original shoot.

The material of the sculpture, which is steel, is susceptible to environmental conditions. With Delaware’s high humidity rust is an ongoing organism that alters the surface. But also light and shadows morph and move across each blade, seemingly growing with the whims of the clouds and sun.

Some outdoor installations are strikingly seductive in their entirety. The massive height of “False Hope” pulls you into her greater appeal: the steel surface’s rust that is, by its nature, continually flowing into new coloration and texture.

The first photo shoot captured the midday bright light, which flowed through the negative spaces, of a clear and cloudless sky. Also midday the second photo shoot was toned and tuned by gorgeous azure blues that turned into gray billowy storm clouds. It was a true opportunity to show the variation in the angels, lines and bold areas of the artwork.

Truly, the cutwork in the steel is the piece’s charisma and charm. Its rough skin keeps gentle pace with nature’s effect on it.

“False Hope” climbs to the sky, and slides to the ground. All in all its marvelous public art.

Its size is dwarfed by the aesthetics and integrity of its artistic intrigue. While its arms reach outward to the sky and its viewers, the surface grabs more than its share of attention. Its totality is stretched by the combination of the separate pieces bound by bolts that mostly are unseen.

But the usual problem exists with an outdoor installation of such heft and height, and situated near power lines, cars, parking lot, signs, trash cans, and other visual clutter. It was especially difficult to get a shot that gave the piece its due.

This outdoor sculpture sits as a frontispiece to the University of Delaware’s Art Building. A triangular grassy space serves as a changing exhibition area. It’s a spot that I watch, because it’s a revolving outdoor art gallery where each piece shows the artist’s dream and inspires the viewer toward individual growth, which is part of what art is meant to do.

Note: As always I welcome any comment about this post or any part of my blog.

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This entry was posted in Black-and-White Photography, Human Nature, Photography and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to WordPress’ Weekly Photo Challenge: Growth, Part Two

  1. Nico says:

    Great photos, specially 2,5,7,8,9, and 11!

  2. First time reader of your blog – – – and really like it! Your commentary coupled with the photos is much appreciated. It gives me great direction. Thanks! Will keep on reading.

  3. Pingback: WordPress' Weekly Photo Challenge: Growth, Part Two | Lens and … | Scion Players

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