Phoneography and Non-SLR Photo Challenge: Nature (and More Afternoon Refractions, Series II)

03 November 2014

Lens:

1. Afternoon Reflections, Copyright © 2014 Sally W. Donatello All Rights Reserved/Lens and Pens by Sally

1. Afternoon Refraction, Copyright © 2014 Sally W. Donatello All Rights Reserved/Lens and Pens by Sally

2. Afternoon Reflections, Copyright © 2014 Sally W. Donatello All Rights Reserved/Lens and Pens by Sally

2. Afternoon Refraction, Copyright © 2014 Sally W. Donatello All Rights Reserved/Lens and Pens by Sally

3. Afternoon Reflections, Copyright © 2014 Sally W. Donatello All Rights Reserved/Lens and Pens by Sally

3. Afternoon Refraction, Copyright © 2014 Sally W. Donatello All Rights Reserved/Lens and Pens by Sally

4. Afternoon Reflections, Copyright © 2014 Sally W. Donatello All Rights Reserved/Lens and Pens by Sally

4. Afternoon Refraction, Copyright © 2014 Sally W. Donatello All Rights Reserved/Lens and Pens by Sally

5. Afternoon Reflections, Copyright © 2014 Sally W. Donatello All Rights Reserved/Lens and Pens by Sally

5. Afternoon Refraction, Copyright © 2014 Sally W. Donatello All Rights Reserved/Lens and Pens by Sally

Let me know which you prefer and why.

Pens:

Fascinated, entranced, beguiled—that’s my reaction to the daily sighting of wispy refractions upon an interior wall. The flickering shapes of light appear, and act as an afternoon anchor.

It’s a sensation on multiple levels. Its quiet metamorphosis builds its effects minute by minute. I glance away and return not knowing what will transpire: what will be its next contours, lines, shadings. Its lure is boundless and ephemeral.

At first I surmise that the light has moved from outside through the window, and then through a clear stain-glass panel. But that’s not correct. The light has simply moved through the window and onto the wall–same place each day, repeatedly morphing into abstractions.

Waves of light seem to slow and quicken, quicken and slow. Timing is characterized by the wavelengths’ behavior and play. Patterns jump and become passive, but not for long.

The refraction’s appearance was a surprise, and I attribute it to the lowering of the sun’s angle in autumn. This visual gift has given me ample reason to sit and ponder this daily performance. Mother Nature’s light shows are especially mesmerizing and seductive.

While my free daily entertainment continues, I am compelled to watch refracted light move through other sources. Limitless experiments can be made. Shine a flashlight through a pile of marbles to achieve color refractions. Fill a glass bottle with liquid and  prepare for a different reaction.

As each medium is altered, the speed of the light is changed. Wonderfully, the only equipment is your Smartphone or camera, one form of light, an object for the light to penetrate, and a surface to view.

Each simmering refraction is like a chameleon that rearranges to suit its outside and inside influences. I’m caught in the unpredictability. Each day it refreshes, and offers a whimsical and thought-provoking luster to the afternoon. I hope that it stays a long time.

The photographs in the Lens section show the pace of the refraction’s images. One-by-one the appearance gave its blessing to new design elements. No magic, just Mother Nature’s brush strokes that create their own reality.

Tip of the Week: I’d like to introduce you to Rob Turney, who is an Australian visual artist and photographer. While photography is his medium, light, refraction and long exposure are his tools. He practices light painting techniques that result in non-representational photographs. He says, “I have a passion for contemporary art and am inspired by the beauty of light in all its various forms. Light is not something that can be physically held, but can only be experienced visually. Much of my work highlights this abstract nature of light, which can only be experienced through our own visual interaction and interpretations.” His photographs inspire as well as show light’s transitory nature. View his work at Rob Turney Visuals: click here.

Refractograph, Rob Turney, Australian photographer

Refractograph, Rob Turney, Australian photographer

View other entries for this week’s challenge:

http://priorhouse.wordpress.com/2014/11/01/burger-bach-and-a-walk/

http://sustainabilitea.wordpress.com/2014/11/03/phoneography-and-non-slr-digital-devices-photo-challenge-nature-hanging-in-there/

http://completelydisappear.wordpress.com/2014/11/03/a-pink-rose/

http://piecesofstarlight.wordpress.com/2014/11/02/10794/

http://streetsofsfphotos.wordpress.com/2014/11/03/spirals-in-nature-3-photos/

http://angelinem.wordpress.com/2014/11/03/phoneography-challengenature-at-the-end-of-day/

http://patchworkponderings.wordpress.com/2014/11/03/travel-theme-autumn-phoneography-nature/

http://uniqueartchic.com/2014/11/03/sunshine-fall/

http://decocraftsdigicrafts.wordpress.com/2014/11/03/phoneography-natures-beauty/

http://angleandviews.wordpress.com/2014/11/03/natures-color-palette/

http://austindetails.me/2014/11/03/iphone-photos-burst-mode/

http://forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com/2014/11/04/phoneography-and-non-slr-photo-challenge-nature-lysoen/

http://nwframeofmind.com/2014/11/03/iphoneography-monday-11-3-14/

http://allkindsaeverything.wordpress.com/2014/11/05/phoneography-and-non-slr-challenge-nature-7/

http://sciencealcove.com/2014/11/832/

Note:

If you’d like to join the Photo Challenge, please click here for details. If you have any questions, please contact me. Below is a reminder of the monthly schedule with themes for upcoming Photo Challenges:

1st Monday: Nature.

2nd Monday: Macro.

3rd Monday: Black and White.

4th Monday Challenger’s Choice (Pick One: Abstraction, Animals, Architecture, Food Photography, Night Photography, Objects, Portraiture, Still Life, Street Photography, and Travel).

5th Monday: Editing and Processing with Various Apps Using Themes from the Fourth Week.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Abstraction, Black-and-White Photography, Design, Mobile Photography, Photography, Writing and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

58 Responses to Phoneography and Non-SLR Photo Challenge: Nature (and More Afternoon Refractions, Series II)

  1. ChristineR says:

    I’m intrigued by these refractions. Thanks for the explanation and the link to Rob Turney’s visual feast.

  2. As you may know, I love abstraction, and these images of refraction really triggers my imagination. Most obvious they look like flying birds, but there are so many other ideas one can create out of these images. Great work, Sally.

  3. ahh the dance!! I think I prefer #3!!

  4. It’s like a bird on flight enveloped with a non-burning fire. Dancing and flying. Beautiful! Have a great week ahead.

  5. They are like dances. I like four. It has a streak of solidity as well as the translucent swirl.

  6. Great captures, Sally. When I look at #1 and #3, the thought of birds in flight immediately pops into my mind! 🙂

  7. Did your originals have some (or a lot of) color in them?

  8. thirdeyemom says:

    Very interesting captures Sally! Your creativity always amazes and inspires me! 🙂

  9. Madhu says:

    So very beautiful Sally! No.1 is my first choice, looks like an angel in flight! And 4 comes a close second. Thank you for the link to Rob Turney Visuals…his work is amazing!

  10. Gallivanta says:

    Lovely to see the dancing light; ballerina like, almost. I love the way the light coming in to the house changes with each season.

  11. #4 is my favorite today, Sally as I see an almost skeletal framework underneath the softer pattern of light. Beautiful choices for this week’s theme.

  12. This light refraction is a fascinating topic. I had a look at Rob Turney’s site and I really wondered what devices he uses to get those kinds of images. Really beautiful.
    I myself, had to stick with Norway as a feature photo this week. The nature there is simply awesome.
    http://forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com/2014/11/04/phoneography-and-non-slr-photo-challenge-nature-lysoen/

  13. Sally, these are so whimsical and remind me of abstracts of photos of a ballerina in motion. Lovely! Made it back safely and enjoyed lots of autumn beauty, although the high winds had taken away many of the leaves. Thought of you when we passed the exit for Longwood.

    janet

  14. My iPhoneography piece today features a life hack: Be happy with what you’ve got.
    “Shooting Waves of iPhone Photos”
    http://austindetails.me/2014/11/03/iphone-photos-burst-mode/
    As always, Sally, thanks for the opportunity, the inspiration and the encouragement.

  15. Sally, I agree with most commenters so far. No’s 2 & 3 have a definite look of a bird in flight. You took these on your wall? Amazing! My entry this week for Nature – taken with the iPhone 6 plus, which I’m gradually getting used to: http://uniqueartchic.com/2014/11/03/sunshine-fall/

  16. These are wonderful Sally-I love the black and white–images #2 and #3 bring to mind a bird in flight-and it makes me eager to upgrade to the iPhone 6-the possibilities are amazing-

    • Oh, please do; I definitely encourage you. I have found it has features that inspire. Mostly, I like the iPhone 6 size, any bigger and it would be too large. Let me know if you get it. Thanks so much.

  17. Amy says:

    Hi Sally, these refraction photos are stunning! So glad to see the images through iPhone 6.

    • I’m slowly loving it more and more. It definitely has qualities that my beloved 4s did not have. I’ve had to imprint myself upon this new device. I’m stunned that I even said that last statement. I’m not a Luddite, but I do have an off-again on-again philosophy about our digital world and its ramifications (pluses and minuses).

      • Amy says:

        These new technology gadgets have brought a lot excitements to our lives. 🙂

      • Amy, they have. But I still use my analog Polaroid SX-70, and hope to explore SLR camera again. I like the idea of various ways to see and capture the world. See you soon. Thanks so much.

      • I’d say the main advantage of an SLR—and I’m not telling you anything you don’t know—is that it offers a lot more control over the image you’re about to create. The sensor (or negative size, if you’re using a film SLR) is also much larger than that of a camera phone, so the quality of the image is better.

      • Yes, I do still do some analog, especially with my Polaroid SX-70, photography, and am contemplating pulling out the SLR. See you soon. Thanks so much.

  18. Angeline M says:

    You’ve set me thinking about light and its refraction, and how truly amazing it is. I love especially your #3; it appears almost to be a bird with raised wings to me. The variations of each photo are lovely. I’ll have to google Rob Turney, the link didn’t work.
    http://angelinem.wordpress.com/2014/11/03/phoneography-challengenature-at-the-end-of-day/

  19. HI Sally, I like light refractions, but I like them in color better. They don’t do anything for me in B&W. I was playing around with the glass of water to achieve this effect.

  20. What a wonder attitude toward the unexpected. Just slowing down to look, that is the gift of choosing to be be an artist, a photographer.
    Number 2 really looks like a bird in flight.
    there is something special about the low Autumn light
    It dances in place up on your wall
    uninvited but welcomed
    Happy Monday Challenge One and all

  21. You certainly make refractions appealing! I’ll be on the lookout for them now. Since you asked, #3 appeals to me most, for the fulfillment of the space by the pattern, its pleasing form, the square shape, and so on and so forth. Looking forward to getting back here with some new nature iPhone images from my weekend on the Texas Gulf Coast–utterly sublime there in autumn. Can’t-put-a-camera-down kinda conditions.

  22. suej says:

    How whimsical are those! I love these….a visual gift indeed. I love the changing shapes, numbers two and three especially as they appear to have some substance….

  23. Maria F. says:

    I love it. It’s like a reality based abstraction. I finally got the monster iPhone 6+ and still have not tried the camera. But that phone even has a time-lapse mode. It’s awesome.

    • Maria, I really appreciate your comment. Each day I am finding new features of the iPhone 6. Do begin to explore the camera, and the deeper you go the more that is revealed. Check online for a manual, or tips to use it. Thanks so much.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s