Spring’s Oriental Pink Poppy and Other Meadow Flowers, Part Two

14 May 2012

Lens:

1. Oriental Pink Poppy, UD Botanic Gardens, May 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

2. Oriental Pink Poppy,UD Botanic Gardens, May 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

3. Ladybug and Daisy, UD Botanic Gardens, May 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

4. Blue Cornflower, UD Botanic Gardens, May 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012 

5. Visitors, UD Botanic Gardens, May 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

6. Oriental Red Poppies, UD Botanic Gardens, May 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

7. Oriental Red Poppy, UD Botanic Gardens, May 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

8. Seed Pod of Oriental Red Poppy, UD Botanic Gardens, May 2012; © Sally W. Donatello and Lens and Pens by Sally, 2012

Let me know which is your favorite.

Pens:

Flowers are the universal communicator; they summon the senses, and are given and received with pleasure. Strangely, the silence of flowers are louder than we think. Within their gaze at us and ours at them, a conversation ensues. For me, that exchange is calming and cathartic. I slow myself to appreciate their quiet gifts.

One single flower or a meadow of profusion, spreads abundance. The drama is contagious and palpable. But in order to grasp what nature has to offer, I must notice, really see each one for its individuality.

For me a photo shoot usually acts as a mirror of life itself. I’m always ready for the camera to do what draws me to its genius: providing a superb eye for my eyes to slow or stop time.

And so, yesterday before twilight I returned to the University of Delaware’s Botanic Gardens. My thoughts were aimed at the small meadow area. How much had progressed in a week.

The mixture of cornflowers, daisies, phlox, and poppies are sublime. Some were flamboyant, and others were quietly awaiting recognition. Oriental poppies grab hold, especially as the light radiates through their papery thin petals. The new and the spent mingled in a lovely slow dance in a chapter of Spring’s story.

This rich array of wildflowers foreshadows the jewels that will sweep across the landscape over the next four to five months. Whether annuals or perennials these offerings of Mother Nature have exploded into existence with the combination of rain and sun that has graced us. Just as I think that we are heading toward a dry spell, the rain intercedes and rescues.

This outing conjured the notion of fragility and generosity within the life cycle. It demonstrated how the shadow of a few days can give us a chance to see the rise of a bud, the pronouncement of a blossom, and the presence of a seed pod. All these elements stand side-by-side, truly giving us a chance to see rejuvenation and transformation up close and personal. And fortunately, a meadow garden creates an ideal place to reflect about renewal today and tomorrow.

Note: As always I welcome any comment about this post or any part of my blog.

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28 Responses to Spring’s Oriental Pink Poppy and Other Meadow Flowers, Part Two

  1. Chris Perez says:

    Wow these shots are stunning. I really like the one with the ladybug

  2. Amy says:

    I look these photos again, they’re so striking! I still can’t pick my favorite one, all are too beautiful! Thanks again!

  3. mandaray says:

    These are absolutely incredible. Is it all right if I use them for desktop wallpaper? I can’t look away from them, they’re so beautiful. I think the first one is probably my favorite, followed by the red poppies. But they’re all amazing. Thank you so much for posting this. =D It made my morning!

  4. Anne Camille says:

    Like #1 for its stunning composition, #2 for the bold colors, #3 because the lady bug makes me smile, #4 because it makes me see the blue cornflower in a different way, #5 because one just can’t leave those ants alone, can we? #8 because it is a different perspective on a flower. #6 & 7 are good shots too!

  5. rtd14 says:

    Beautiful post! The first picture makes me feel like I’m looking at a pretty coral reef. I love the blue cornflower. You’re right, there is a universal language with flowers.

  6. Geoff says:

    The ladybug photo is the pick … I was tempted to choose something else since everyone has chosen the same picture but I kept returning to it.

  7. aviatrixkim says:

    The ladybug photo is fantastic! As are they all.

  8. My favorites are the ladybug in the daisy. It’s spectacular! You just get better and better.

  9. Gracie says:

    Lovely post, Sally! I love the photo of the ladybug on the flower. I think you captured that moment really well!

  10. Amy says:

    Stunningly beautiful! You are right, “the silence of flowers are louder than we think.” What a treat to see through your “lens” and read your eloquent “pens”! Thank you so much Sally!

  11. I love the ladybug photo, although here we call them ladybirds!

    • Ladybugs(never heard them called ladybirds) are always a sign of healthy gardens. In the past I have bought them and scattered hundreds, hoping that they stay or visit my neighbors. Thanks, Sally

  12. Beautiful work!! The vivid and bold colors are truly captivating. Wonderful work and writing as always 🙂

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